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Pieter Theuns

Pieter Theuns studied at the Lemmensinstitute, the Royal Conservatory of Brussels, and the Académie Baroque Européenne d'Ambronay. Throughout the years, the switched his guitar for the lute and the mighty theorbo.

His mission is to build bridges between musical genres - and people. In 2010, this resulted in the foundation of the Baroque Orchestration X collective, that since then has carried out an impressive list of national and international collaborations.

Pieter x B.O.X

Lute and theorbo player Pieter is the enthusiastic captain of the B.O.X vessel.

 


© Stijn Swinnens, post production: Joren Van Utterbeeck

© Stijn Swinnens, post production: Joren Van Utterbeeck

Mattijs Vanderleen

Percussionist Mattijs Vanderleen works in dance, theatre, pop-rock, world music, classical, and electronic music. He played, amongst others, with Arno, Les Ballets C de la B, Let the music Speak, Toneelgroep Amsterdam, and Marble Sounds.

Mattijs x B.O.X

“If you want to paint, you need colour.”

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Jutta Troch

Harpist Jutta Troch plays nationally and internationally with renowned classical ensembles, and projects revolving around own arrangements and improvisation. She’s co-founder of ‘Besides’, an ensemble combining new music in a theatre setting.

Jutta x B.O.X

Jutta’s weapon of choice is the baroque harp.

Representative of ‘girl power’.

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Pieter Vandeveire

Pieter Vandeveire is double bass player and gambist. With both instruments, he moves in various musical spheres: from orchestrated historical performances to contemporary works. After hours, he plays jazz and world music in his ‘Broken Heart Trio’.

Pieter x B.O.X

Pieter lifts the viola da gamba out of its old music context, and places it in a contemporary environment.


© Virginie Schreyen

© Virginie Schreyen

Anthony Romaniuk

Keyboard player Anthony Romaniuk composes, improvises, and performs existing music. Genre is of no importance to him: the execution of classical pieces alternates with collaborations in the electronic music world.

Anthony x B.O.X

Anthony’s instruments are organ and harpsichord.

He also operates the aeropress coffee maker.

© Alexandra Renska

© Alexandra Renska

Ira Givol

Cellist Ira Givol loves Bach and baseball. As an adolescent, he mostly listened to the Beatles. Rather surprisingly, he later on specialized himself in the performance of historical classical compositions.

Ira x B.O.X

Ira plays the cello. In 2017 he started to play with B.O.X, aiming to add spice to classical music performances.


© Aimée Roebroeks

© Aimée Roebroeks

Bart Vroomen

Trombone player Bart Vroomen is home in many musical genres. He studied classical bass trombone, jazz, and baroque trombone. Bart makes his trombone sing - and roar when needed - in symphonic orchestras, big bands, and historical ensembles.

Bart x B.O.X

“Like a good bass trombone player should, I lay out a firm (and sometimes a bit too loud) foundation.”

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Jon Birdsong

In the US, trumpet player Jon Birdsong collaborated with various jazz and pop groups, amongst which Beck and Calexico. In 2003, he came to Antwerp where he discovered the ‘cornetto’: a wooden, 15th century, wind instrument.

Jon X B.O.X

Jon adds his cornetto’s remarkable, early baroque colours to contemporary music.


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Lambert Colson

Cornetto player Lambert Colson is specialized in the historical performance of old music. He plays across the whole of Europe. Always looking for new possibilities to use his instrument, he also works with contemporary composers, and pop and jazz musicians.

Lambert x B.O.X

The cornetto sounds like a surreal mix between a human voice and a trumpet. In B.O.X, it’s used when a mellow cuddle is required.


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Joshua Cheatham

Joshua Cheatham studied viola da gamba, violone, and double bass. He followed masterclasses with Jordi Savall. He regularly performs with Capriccio Stravagante, the Dutch Bach Foundation and the Akademie für Alte Musik.


© Tom Roelofs

© Tom Roelofs

Liam Byrne

Viola da gamba virtuoso Liam Byrne doesn’t restrict himself to the more obscure baroque works, but also collaborates on contemporary and electronic compositions, and installed a sound work at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.